Pruning for More Light

There are two fundamental methods of pruning both of which are usually needed at some time in the life of a tree. Thinning means to take branches that are whole out, and produces a more open, graceful- looking specimen. Thinning is the most significant kind of pruning you can do if your aim is to permit more light to increase air circulation and to reach the earth. Before pruning any branches, analyze the shade pattern it casts at various times throughout the day and the tree. First remove any rubbing branches, or those who grow toward the middle of the tree as opposed to outward, when thinning a shade tree. Annually never remove more than a third of the branches. Trees react to serious pruning with a rush of vigorous development which can choke the tree and make it more heavy than ever. If you wish to prune greatly, do so in late June or July, when this vigorous response will not be more.

Selectively prune away before removing a major limb little branches if less shade is desired after these branches are removed. No matter what size branch you might be pruning, cut flush, and always prune at a junction of two branches .

Heading back involves removing the ends of the branches to create denser foliage and a more bushy plant.

There are some cases where the garden would take advantage of the entire removal of tree or a large shrub. The passing of time just makes the situation worse, if the plants were placed too close to begin with. Spend time imagining what the area will look like in its lack when deciding which plant has to go. This can be a careful first step that can take some of the worry from an irrevocable decision.