Common Boxwood Broad-Leafed Evergreen Shrub

Shaped as cubes and spheres and teddy bears, this is the plant most commonly used to shear into fantastic shapes. Besides topiary and trimmed hedges, the common boxwood also makes an uncommonly exquisite specimen in old age, since it grows quite slowly into a gnarled, spreading, and open treelike shrub. 10 to 20 feet in height and width. It is known by most of us as a young plant, nevertheless,
ever, when it’s a dainty, rounded. Dense shrub. It does not do well in extremes of heat and cold, and is subject to a broad variety of insect and disease pests.

Plant boxwood in well-drained, moist soil that is generously amended with organic matter, and mulch heavily to provide a cool, moist root run. Each year prune out the dead twigs that are inner and remove the fallen leaves that accumulate in the branch crotches. This will assist in preventing twig canker disorder, which will be common in the East. Boxwoods are cultivated around by never, because they root close to the surface. Drought will not be tolerated by them. Shield them from drying winds and excessive temperatures, and give them moderate shade in hot climates, moderate shade to full sunlight elsewhere. Many cultivars are available for increased hardiness and different forms and sizes. ‘Northern Find’ and ‘Vardar Valley’ are two of the hardiest (to Zone 5).

Buxus microphylla (Littleleaf Boxwood) is similar to the common boxwood, except that it’s slightly hardier and more delicately textured, and its leaf normally turns yellow-brown in cold weather. Ethnic directions and landscape uses are the same as for common boxwood.